Tribeca Film Festival 2017: Ten Films We’re Looking Forward To Seeing

Apr 11, 2017
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Since its inception in 2002, the Tribeca Film Festival has striven to redefine the festival experience and provide a platform for the international film community to spotlight many of its most promising new movies. In addition to the more than 100 features, shorts, and documentaries making their debut there, Tribeca ’17 features several special, once-in-a-lifetime screenings, including a back-to-back showing of The Godfather I & II followed by a Q&A with Francis Ford Coppola, Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, and other members of the cast, and a 25th anniversary screening of Reservoir Dogs, after which Quentin Tarantino and others will be present to reflect on the making of their movie. This is also the inaugural year for Tribeca Games, a weekend-long festival celebrating video games and featuring keynote talks with creators such as Hideo Kojima and Ken Levine.

Our coverage of the festival will begin on April 20th, and we’ll be bringing you regular updates on what we’ve seen, who we’ve talked to, and what we’ve experienced at the downtown film fest. With 30 sceenings on our schedule and many more we’re desperately hoping to squeeze in, Tribeca is shaping up to be our year’s busiest and most exciting 10 days for movie-going.  

Without further buildup, here are ten films our Cinema Editor, Austin Trunick, is particularly looking forward to at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival.

tribecafilm.com

Dir. By Ellen Goldfarb

Dare to be Different

This documentary chronicles the rise and fall of WLIR 92.7, the trendsetting New York radio station that introduced many of the 1980s’ biggest musical acts – Duran Duran, U2, the Cure, and Depeche Mode, to name just a few – to America’s eager ears. Their story is told through vintage footage as well as new interviews with artists such as Debbie Harry, Billy Idol, and Joan Jett. (One special screening at the festival will even feature an opening performance by Flock of Seagulls.)

Dir. By Tabbert Fiiller

The Public Image Is Rotten

This candid documentary sees Johnny Rotten (nee John Lydon), the one-time Sex Pistol who had a revitalizing second act heading the influential Public Image Ltd., open up about his career as one of rock ‘n’ roll’s preeminent button-pushers. He’s joined by past bandmates and musical luminaries like Thurston Moore, Moby, Flea, and the Beastie Boys’ Adam Horovitz in discussing his legacy.

Dir. By Julian Rosefeldt

Manifesto

This experimental one-woman show features Cate Blanchett taking on multiple roles of different genders, cultures, professions, and time periods, as she delivers the point-blank manifestos of Karl Marx, Dogma 95, and others. We’re eager to watch Blanchett morph between the disparate roles, which she reportedly filmed in a matter of days.

Dir. By Max Winkler

Flower

Zoey Deutch, who recently brought some humanity to the otherwise far too broad comedy Why Him?, here plays a teenager who seduces older men and then extorts money from them in this dark comedy directed from a Black List script by Alex McAulay. A strong supporting cast of funny people includes Adam Scott, Kathryn Hahn, and Tim Heidecker.

Dir. By Alexandra Dean

Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story

While cinema fans around the globe know Hedy Lamarr as an icon of the silver screen, less know of her scientific endeavors for the Allies during World War II, or as the inventor of the technology which would eventually become modern Wi-Fi. Bombshell traces her life from Austrian émigré to MGM movie star, to inventor and through her eventual decline into poverty.

Dir. By Pat Healy

Take Me

Indie actor Pat Healy – who’s appeared in some old UTR favorites, like Compliance and Cheap Thrills – helms this bizarre-sounding film about a businessman who runs a kidnap-for-hire company for wealthy thrillseekers. Healy stars in this dark comedy opposite Orange is the New Black’s Taylor Schilling.

Dir. By Chris Perkel

Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives

This documentary adapts the autobiography of famed producer and music industry exec Clive Davis, whose influence helped make the careers of Janis Joplin, Bruce Springsteen, Aerosmith, Barry Manilow, Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston, Usher, Alicia Keys, and an unbelievable countless others. (Aretha Franklin will perform before the movie’s gala premiere.)

Dir. By Quinn Shephard

Blame

An emotionally imbalanced high school student sparks an inappropriate relationship with her substitute drama teacher in a film that looks to be a modern-day take on The Crucible. This is the feature debut of 22-year-old Quinn Shephard, who wrote, directed, and stars in the film.

Dir. By Nick Broomfield and Rudi Dolezal

Whitney. “can I be me?”

In 2012, pop music lost one of its highest-selling and most-awarded female artists of all time when Whitney Houston was found dead in a Beverly Hills bathtub. Can I be me? recounts the sad story of Houston’s meteoric rise and the downward spiral which led to her untimely death with never before seen behind-the-scenes footage from her career.

Dir. By Brian Shoaf

Aardvark

Jenny Slate plays a therapist who winds up caught between two men: an unstable man suffering from troublesome hallucinations (Zachary Quinto) and his famous TV star brother (Jon Hamm). It doesn’t sound like that difficult a choice to us, but we’re eager to see how it all sorts out in this quirky-sounding dramedy from playwright Brian Shoaf.

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Coches electricos para ninos
November 19th 2017
10:10am

Very nice postl. I´m really looking forward to watch these films. I´ve always been interested on underground culture and some of these movies represent what I like the most.