The Kills

Watch: The Kills Video for Saul Williams “List of Demands” Cover

Mar 01, 2018

The Kills are back after a year and a half of touring their 2016 album Ash & Ice, this time with a cover of Saul Williams' 2004 slam banger "List of Demands (Reparations). Check out the video directed by Ben Strabel below. The cover is being released as a 7" with cover art by Shepard Fairey. all artists in this mix have mutual respect for one another:

"List of Demands" was so impactful to us-it was the kind of song that would come on backstage and everyone would stop what they were doing and stand up," the Kills’ Jaime Hince says. "The more I found myself listening to the lyrics, the more I heard in them, and found myself singing along with goose bumps. The brilliant thing about it is that it speaks to so many different ideas-a true underground thing like the best Iggy Pop songs."

Saul Williams returned the compliment, waxing rhapsodically about The Kills' tribute. "I always felt envious of the way the 60's generation shared songs and ideologies. Jimi singing Dylan. Rotary Connection singing Otis Redding. The Stones singing the blues," Williams said. "This is all part of the beauty and power of music and it reverberates deeply in me. All this to say, I'm honored. I liked The Kills before they chose to cover 'LOD.' If they can feel themselves in that song, it's because they are as much a part of it as I am."

Artist Shepard Fairey, whose striking image was created for the single's sleeve art, says, "I've been a fan of The Kills for years, and I initially loved them because I can't say no to great garage rock with attitude, grit, and a vocalist in Alison Mosshart with a ridiculous amount of heart and soul. In recent years though, they've turned into even more than that. They're now great songwriters who have stayed true to their roots but also expanded their musical palette. When Alison and Jamie approached me about doing the art for the song "List of Demands" and shared their version of the song, I was excited both because I love their version of the song, and I think it's a song that makes sense for the state of things in the world right now. We need music that speaks to the struggles of the average person in the face of oppressive powers. The art I created was meant to reflect the sentiment of the song and the idea that people have power in numbers and are looking back at those in power with their hands up, making their demands. The do-it-yourself spirit of punk rock and activist propaganda influenced the art and design."