Under the Radar’s Holiday Gift Guide 2018 Part 1: Video Games

Gifts for Fans of All Video Gaming Eras

Nov 20, 2018
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It’s that time of year already – welcome to Under the Radar's Holiday Gift Guide 2018. As in previous years, the guide will be divided up into various parts. This first entry will dive into the world of video games, both modern and retro.

Over the coming weeks we’ll be posting our gift recommendations for music lovers, board gamers, toys and collectible fans, comic book readers, movie fanatics, tech heads and more. And as always, please don’t forget just how great a gift that a subscription to Under the Radar makes for the indie music fan in your life. (Or, consider making a donation to the charity of your choice – ‘tis the season for giving, after all!)

The Big One

Arcade1up’s Retro Video Game Cabinets (Arcade1up)

SRP: $299

Let’s get right down to business: if you’re looking for this season’s ultimate gamer gift, one that will earn prominent placement in their living room and you a spot atop their list of all-time favorite people, look no further than Arcade1up’s newly-launched line of home arcade cabinets.

If you’re 30 years of age or older, you no doubt have fond memories of feeding quarter after quarter into your favorite game at a local arcade, skating rink, or pizza place. In those days, you probably dreamed of one day having one of those machines in your bedroom, basement, or other favorite hangout. Sure, a lot of those games were ported over to consoles, but the truth is that playing Street Fighter II with a controller just wasn’t the same as dishing out hadoukens standing shoulder-to-shoulder with your best pal at the arcade. Unfortunately years of screen burn-in, spilled soft drinks and other general abuse have caused many of the vintage cabinets to fall into disrepair, and put the surviving real deals out of financial reach for most arcade fans. But thanks to Arcade1up, you can now help the gamer in your life live out a hitherto-unfulfilled childhood dream.

The Arcade1up machines are faithful recreations of popular arcade classics, but at three-quarters scale. This small decrease in size makes the machines more feasible for living spaces and light enough that it can be carried down into a basement or to an upstairs bedroom. (They can be comfortably played from a chair, or standing with a riser that's sold separately.) Outside of the size difference these look, feel, and play like the genuine article. Each of the six units currently available offers a different set of classic games, each with appropriate controls: you can go head-to-head with a friend over dual joysticks with the Street Fighter II: Championship Edition machine, outrun ghosts in several Pac-Man games, or fight for high scores in an assortment of dial-controlled titles such as Asteroids, Tempest, and Lunar Lander. We were pleased to discover how responsive and heavy-duty-feeling the trackball was on the Centipede cabinet we’ve been vigorously playtesting over the past week; where so many other arcade-style controllers we’ve played with over the years felt cheap and flimsy, everything about the Arcade1up’s buttons felt legit and true-to-the-original. (Other units feature Galaga as well as Rampage, Joust, and other Midway classics. For a breakdown of the various Arcade1up units and their included games, check out their website.)

There are other small changes you’ll notice, but we’d consider them improvements. The Arcade1up uses a bright, flatscreen display – unlike the old CRTs, which would fade over time and were sometimes difficult to see in the corners of the screen. The volume can be controlled easily from the front of the machine, and you can flip between the various games with quickness and ease. High scores are saved even when the unit is turned off, meaning you’ll be able to keep prop track of who holds the Missile Command bragging rights in your household. Did we mention these things are beautiful? The marquee and side artwork are faithful to the original arcade games, featuring the same iconic imagery you remember from your youth. (Colorful units like Centipede and Pac-Man are especially eye-grabbing.) These units are assembled by following a clear, well-illustrated instruction booklet. It’s a lot like putting together an Ikea chair, but way, way cooler. (We’d recommend waiting until your giftee has fallen asleep, and then sneaking out to assemble it yourself – can you imagine their surprise when they find a full arcade cabinet wrapped up next to the Christmas tree?)

One last thing worth mentioning, and it’s that these aren’t just for the nostalgically-minded gamer. Because of their size, they’re at a perfect scale for children. If you’re a parent looking to share the arcade experience with your child, you’ll have a blast playing through these classics together.

If you really want to knock the socks off a gamer in your life, we can’t recommend the Arcade1up line enough.  (Buy them here.)

Books

The NES and SNES Visual Compendiums (Bitmap Books)

SRP: £29.99 each

If you’re shopping for anyone even remotely interested in retro gaming, then we’d like to draw your attention towards the U.K.-based publisher Bitmap Books. When their stateside webstore launches on December 1st, U.S. gaming fans will be able to get their hands on Bitmap’s line of retro-centric books without paying for overseas shipping. Less money on shipping = more $$$ to spend on books.

Console gamers will be most interested in two of their titles: their NES/Famicom: A Visual Compendium and SNES/Super Famicom: A Visual Compendium. A cross between art books and visual encyclopedias, these volumes are nothing short of a celebration of everything that made these two consoles such beloved touchstones of our collective gaming experience. Housed in heavyweight slipcases with snazzy lenticular covers, each of Bitmap’s Visual Compendium books is more than 500 pages of elegantly-illustrated Nintendo artwork and photography lined with commentary from games journalists, designers, artists, and fans. They serve as histories of the consoles, from their origins in Japan through their marketing in the U.S. and Europe, all the way up through the modern homebrew games community. Inside you’ll find detailed histories of some of these console generations’ essential labels (Capcom, Namco, Acclaim, Enix, Hudson Soft) as well as interviews with industry figures from the era. (One of our favorites was with paint Tom duBois, whose artwork graced the cover of most of the U.S.-released Konami games – and who admits to never having played most of the games he’s worked on!) We enjoyed reading insights not only into the games we love and grew up with, but rare Japanese- and Europe-only releases which never hit U.S. shelves.

These books are absolutely fantastic, and easily the most loving tributes to each console that we’ve ever seen. Home computer fans should also scope out their volumes on the Commodore 64, Amiga, and ZX Spectrum, and keep their eyes peeled for our full, upcoming review of their newly-released The Art of Point-and-Click Adventure Games, which is an absolute treasure for anyone who grew up in the golden age of LucasArts and Sierra. (Buy them here in the U.K. / Buy them here in the U.S. starting December 1st.)

Vinyl

Contra - Original Video Game Soudntrack LP (Mondo)

SRP: $25

For all of its limitations, there was no shortage of iconic soundtracks amongst the games in the NES library: from Mega Man 2 to Castlevania, Super Mario Brothers (all three of the main, underground, and underwater themes) to Tetris, The Legend of Zelda and Metroid – if you’ve played any of these games, you can probably still hum those tunes to this day. Released in 1987, Contra still holds up today as one of the all-time best run-and-gun platformers ever to hit consoles. It also, incidentally, has one of the best musical scores of the 8-bit console generation. Mondo have taken that music and pressed it to sharp-looking, red-and-blue wax, not only blessing the release with top-notch audio quality but new cover artwork (by Goon artist Eric Powell!) that’s so much better than the game’s original, lazy box art. (Did you notice how the original NES artist simply traced Arnold Schwarzenegger’s pose from the VHS cover of Predator?)

Side A features the NES version of the score, while side B contains the soundtrack for the Contra arcade game. Even if it’s been 20+ years since you’ve last played Contra, there’s no way you don’t remember the game’s opening riff – you probably heard it half a dozen times whenever you played, considering how essential it was to reset to the intro screen if you botched your entry of the Konami code. (Buy it here.)

Space Harrier – Original Soundtrack LP (Data Discs)

SRP: $27

Data Discs’ vinyl release of Space Harrier features one of the best video game soundtrack remasters we’ve ever heard. Space Harrier’s score is absolutely breathtaking here – with this high audio quality, it sounds more like a pristine, ‘80s synthpop production rather than something that came from a 16-bit video game cartridge. Let’s put it this way: if you didn’t know this was from an old Sega game, you’d probably guess that these were choice instrumentals from a chillwave artist like Neon Indian, or leaked cuts from that repeatedly-delayed Chromatics album. These are tunes you can get into even without any nostalgic connection to the Sega classic. (Buy it here.)

Castlevania: Symphony of the Night - Original Video Game Soundtrack 2xLP (Mondo)

SRP: $35

It’s amazing how well 1997’s Symphony of the Night holds up to this day. After more than 20 years, it’s still the best Metroidvania-style game to have ever been released – it’s such an impressive and fun game that it’s been continuously released every few years. (The latest incarnation can be found in Castlevania Requiem, released for the PS4 just a few weeks ago.)

With a title like Symphony of the Night, it had to have good music – and you can bet that its soundtrack doesn’t let you down. Mondo has reissued its iconic score – an idiosyncratic but oh-so-good mix of baroque classical, gothic organ, and intense hair metal-style riffage – as a deluxe, double-LP vinyl set. Pressed on a variety of colors (including a stunning 180-gram silver swirl with white splatter), the soundtrack features newly-commissioned gatefold artwork and seven bonus tracks from the rare, Japan-only Sega Saturn release of the game. (Buy it here.)

Shadow of the Colossus 2xLP Vinyl Soundtrack (iam8bit)

SRP: $40

It’s hard to forget your first time playing Shadow of Colossus. To save his beloved, our hero makes a pact to slay more than a dozen colossal beasts spread out across a sprawling, forsaken island. Never before did a game so grandly project a sense of massive scale; many of the beasts moved like lumbering mountains, requiring you to climb their bodies to reach their weak points high above the ground. When the remake was released more than a decade later, the impressiveness of the monsters’ size had not diminished. A game of such epic proportions wouldn’t be right without a properly epic musical score, and composer Kow Otani doesn’t disappoint – the sweeping orchestral pieces mirror the game’s inimitable majesty. This heavy-duty vinyl release presents Otani’s classic score on blue- and white-colored vinyl, with incredible gatefold artwork by Nimit Malavia. (Buy it here.)  

Katamari Damacy – Original Video Game Soundtrack (Mondo)

SRP: $35

Released in 2004, Katamari Damacy is probably one of the strangest console video games to ever become a console hit, with its odd premise, wacky characters, and highly-quotable dialogue that borders on nonsense. (You can see its influence in any modern game that dares to be playfully bizarre – just look at the cutscenes for the recent Overcooked games for some obviously Katamari-inspired madness.)

The score for Katamari Damacy is every bit as eclectic as the game, sweeping the “Best Soundtrack” category at all of the big video game outlets in the year it was released. You have the game’s wacky, unforgettable sing-a-long theme, but also a wild mix of bossa nova, jazz, mambo, swing, and pop – an incredibly lively assortment that never gets old, and stands up just as well when it’s removed from the video game which inspired it. Mondo’s 2LP Katamari Damacy set is newly remastered on 180 gram, multi-colored vinyl. It’s housed in a striking, gatefold LP with inner poly sleeves that mimic that chaos and clutter our heroic prince rolls up in each level of the classic game. (Buy it here.)

What Remains of Edith Finch - Original Soundtrack(iam8bit)

SRP: $28

If I were asked to name my most memorable game experience of our current console generation, I would point towards 2017’s What Remains of Edith Finch without a moment’s hesitation. The story follows young Edith – the last surviving member of the supposedly cursed Finch family – as she returns to her recently-abandoned family home deep in the woodlands of the Pacific Northwest. The old mansion is the strangest of constructions, full of secret passages and walled-off rooms. As she moves through it, you’ll learn the individual stories of each member of the Finch family – every one of which ends in their sad, often unforeseen death. Their tragic tales are told in widely varying styles, each ingenious in its own, unique way – from b-movie actress Barbara Finch’s untimely end (told in an old, E.C. horror comic book format) to Lewis’ crumbling grip on reality, envisioned in a medieval fantasy setting. Composer Jeff Russo (of TV’s Fargo and Power) stretches out in each of these “mini-experiences,” giving each its own, individual musical flavor. Hearing each of them on this beautiful, weighty piece of vinyl from iam8bit, I was immediately returned to the game’s rich, heartbreaking world, with each track bringing back to mind the Finch family’s melancholy story – don’t be surprised if a couple tracks leave you misty-eyed. (Buy it here.)

Apparel

(Image: Insert Coin)

Stylish Gaming Tees (Insert Coin)

SRP: Starting at £22.00

Yes, you can wear your video game fandom without looking like a cast member from the Big Bang Theory.  The gamer who doesn’t leave his basement couch is a baseless stereotype, so why do chain stores only sell gaming-themed clothes no one would want to be caught dead wearing in public? Thankfully we have Insert Coin, a company that specializes in apparel for the fashion-forward gamer. Their design sense is pretty amazing, and their shirts are 1000x better-fitted than anything you’d pull off a rack at GameStop or Target. Plus, these shirts are officially licensed – meaning, they’re way less sketchy than any of the shirts you’d buy off one of those daily tees sites. Here are a few of our favorite lines from Insert Coin:

Katamari Damacy – As you might expect, these licensed Katamari shirts are every bit as kooky as the series that inspired them. The incredible “Pattern Prince” design shown here will have our hero rollin’ all over your torso, while the more reserved “Pocket Prince” shirt and logo hoodie allow you to rock your Katamari love with more conservative patterns.

Sega Mega Drive – Retro gamers are going to dig this line of tees which celebrate classic releases from Sega’s beloved 16-bit console. (U.S. fans know it better as the Sega Genesis, but we don’t need to tell you that.) Pick your favorite Sega classic with bold logo tees that rep such unforgettable games as Streets of Rage or Altered Beast, or roll with the conversation-starting shirt shown above, which features the console’s original Japanese logo.

Life is Strange – Insert Coin have partnered with Square Enix to put out the official clothing line for Life is Strange, which you’ll know (if you continue to read this guide) is one of our favorite franchises to crop up in the last decade.  It’s probably the most fashion-sensible, as well, with its heroines Max and Chloe having a large wardrobe of hip apparel for players to choose from. You can slip into many of those designs IRL thanks to Insert Coin, in what’s probably the most subtle way to wear your love for a video game – these shirts look pretty awesome without necessarily screaming, “I’m a hardcore gamer.” Check out Max’s “Doe” tee above, or cruise on to Insert Coin’s site to browse other wearables, including a Blackwell Academy letterman jacket.

Head over to their online store to look at their other lines, from sleek Destiny duds to an absolutely incredible, reversible PlayStation logo jacket. (Buy them here.)

Gaming Holiday Sweaters (Merchoid)

SRP: $37.99 - $58.99

Peppermint sticks. Light strings. Inflatable Santas. The red Starbucks cup. There are sights that herald the holiday season, and the most garish among them is usually the ugly holiday sweater. However, what started a decade ago as an excuse to parade out your ironic thrift shop finds is now its own fashion statement: Christmas sweaters are no longer exclusively hideous, but can be legitimately cool. If you’re a video games fan – or, heck, a fan of pop culture in general – you owe it to yourself to browse Merchoid’s selection of holiday sweaters, which take their inspiration from a wide array of retro classics to recent hits. You can be the most eye-catching relative at your family holiday gatherings in this red-and-white Super Mario Brothers sweater that features the 8-bit Italian plumber a-leapin’ across your chest, or stay warm while braving the elements to get your fix of Pokemon Go with this sharp-looking Pokeball holiday sweater. Their full assortment offers holiday sweaters for gamers of all generations, from Atari admirers to Fallout fanatics. Browse the full selection on their website not only for gaming-related sweaters, but movie- and comic-centric gear – saying there’s “something for everyone” is a bit of a cliché, but in this case that statement is 100% true. (Buy it here.)

Gear

SCUF Vantage Controller for PS4 (SCUF Gaming)

SRP: Starting at $169.95

If you spend as much time holding a video game controller as we do, you’ll start to notice the little deficiencies in the controllers that came packed with your systems. One of the things that always gets me is a surprising lack of buttons. We’ve come a long way since the single orange button of the Atari 2600’s classic joystick, and games have become increasingly advanced; even with the bevy of buttons on a standard PS4 controller, you’ll find yourself awkwardly reaching over yourself or mashing thumbsticks to pull off a game’s lesser-used moves. In releases that require quick actions and twitch reflexes, a case of fat thumbs can quickly turn an otherwise sure victory into a crushing defeat.

Designed with the competitive gamer in mind, SCUF’s Vantage PS4 controller is like the Cadillac of PlayStation controllers. It adds two new, side-mounted “sax” buttons to the shoulders of the controller alongside four back-mounted paddles, all mappable to your own individual preference. The new buttons are comfortable and easy to reach, and triggers can be adjusted to your preferred sensitivity. The Vantage also features offset analog sticks that will be appreciated if you, like us, have grown accustomed to the placement of the Xbox controller’s joysticks.

Other customization options include a control disc to replace the d-pad, trigger covers, and thumbsticks of varying heights. (There’s a wide assortment of deeper customizations on SCUF’s website, if you want to truly personalize your device.) The whole thing feels sleek and luxurious in your hands, and while none of us here can claim to be a pro-level gamer, it made our casual experience so much more personalized and to our liking, allowing us to control our games the way we desire. If you do a lot of gaming, you might as well do it in comfort. (Buy it here.)

Pac-Man ¼ Scale Arcade Cabinet (Numskull Designs / Quarter Arcades)

SRP: £149.99

I’m sure there are plenty of you out there who’ve dreamed of having a home arcade but can’t fathom the thought of having room for a large machine. (As a former New Yorker whose twin bed also had to function as his couch, work space, and occasionally a dinner table, I feel your pain.) The Quarter Arcade line consists of faithful replicas of famous quarter-munchers, standing roughly 17” tall – approximately one fourth the size of the originals. These are fully-playable arcade cabinets with 5” screens but small enough to fit on your desktop, with attention paid to details all the way down to the wooden exterior and metal coinbox. The first release in the series is the classic Pac-Man, which will be shipping soon; future titles will spotlight other well-known games so that you can one day assemble them together into a full, miniaturized arcade. (Buy it here.) 

Games

Strange Brigade(Rebellion Developments)

SRP: $49.99, or $79.99 for Deluxe Edition including Season Pass

This co-op action game from the makers of the Sniper Elite franchise takes its inspiration from 1930s pulp adventure serials: imagine a highly-caffeinated, zombie-filled take on the Alan Quatermain tales, mix in plenty of supernatural boss-types and add sprawling levels full of traps and hidden treasures and you’ve got a close approximation of the Strange Brigade experience. This is a shooter that’s as silly as it is challenging, requiring cooperation with your teammates to solve its myriad puzzles while a chatty narrator gives a humorously dry play-by-play. Strange Brigade takes its unique inspiration and runs away with it, from cutscenes that resemble WWII-era newsreels to characters with tongue-in-cheek names like “Bash” Conaghan and Archimedes de Quincey.

Gameplay-wise, you’ll be squaring off against relentless hordes of the undead and nasty critters like scorpions of unusual size. Your characters and their weapons are highly customizable, and a variety of modes let you tailor your gaming session to whatever fits the evening’s mood. If your gaming squad has been looking for that fun, fast-paced, lighthearted co-op experience you’ve longed for since the glory days of Left 4 Dead and Borderlands, look no further than Strange Brigade. An optional (but recommended) season pass will continue to add new content, including extra missions, to the game as the months roll on, meaning there will be plenty for you and your friends to dig into throughout the coming year. (Available for XB1, PS4, & Steam: Buy it here.)   

Mega Man 11 (CAPCOM)

SRP: $29.99

Over its 30 years, the Mega Man series hasn’t strayed far from its roots; the sequels would occasionally introduce small changes, but rarely did they rock the boat. And why should they, when early entries such as Mega Man 2 and the first Mega Man X are still considered by many to be near-perfect video games? There are those, though, who would argue that the series had gotten too old-fashioned. The series’ latest installment, Mega Man 11, is its most daring and innovative since the jump to the X series, and should be enough to bring even the most jaded fans of the Blue Bomber back around.

Mega Man 11 is a purely modern take on a familiar, beloved formula. All of the series’ trademarks are present, from the game’s weapon-stealing gameplay, iconic boss selection screen and musical cues, to its often punishingly difficult platforming action. What’s truly exciting about this long-awaited sequel – the last numbered entry landed all the way back in 2010 – are the things that are new to this incarnation game. These include two new, recharging power-up abilities: one which slows time and the other which super-sizes the attack of whichever weapon you’ve equipped. The level design is not only top-notch, but the most playful we’ve ever seen in these games; from one area that feels like a carnival bounce house from Hell, to another where seemingly everything from the enemies to the platforms beneath your feet pack an explosive punch. There’s also a “newcomer” difficulty, complete with a little robot bird who’ll catch you when you inevitably mistime a jump and plummet to your death. As someone who’s never managed to see the end of a Mega Man game without the help of a Game Genie, it’s a very welcome option. (Available for XB1, PS4, NS, & Steam: Buy it here.)

Tempest 4000 (ATARI)

SRP: $29.99

If you’re looking for a modern take on an even older title, you should take a glimpse of Tempest 4000, a highly-updated remake of the classic Atari game of the same name (and a sequel to the under-played Jaguar gem Tempest 2000.) This is essentially the same shoot-your-way-through vector lanscapes gameplay that hit arcades all the way back in 1981, but with far more variation and 100 different levels to get through. The real attraction, however, is the incredible, trance-inducing electronic soundtrack and the game’s positively lysergic graphics – what looks simple on the surface, both conceptually and visually, blooms into something much more deep and addictive. Tempest breathes all-new life into the legendary arcade game. (Available for XB1, PS4, & Steam: Buy it here.)

SEGA Genesis Classics (SEGA

SRP: $29.99

These retrospective game bundles have been popping up more and more over the years. Our favorite to come along since 2015’s Rare Replay is this year’s SEGA Genesis Classics. This particular release is notable because it doesn’t collect only a single series or franchise, but more than fifty varied games from a 16-bit console that's just now hitting its nostalgic peak. You get classic beat-em-ups with three releases each from the Golden Axe and Streets of Rage franchises, more Sonic games than you can shake a stick at, seminal 16-bit RPGs such as numerous Shining Force games and Phantasy Star sequels, twitch-triggering shooters like Space Harrier II and Galaxy Force II, and even a handful of cult favorites such as Toejam & Earl and Gunstar Heroes. This is an instant retro gaming collection at a low price, and offers up plenty of bonus features and challenge modes to play through. We especially loved how the menu page is laid out like an early ‘90s bedroom. (Available for XB1, PS4, NS, &S Steam: Buy it here.)

Life is Strange 2 (Square Enix)

SRP: $39.99 for season pass

It’s risky for a franchise to leave behind everything that fans are familiar with; once you've played through Life is Strange and its prequel, Life is Strange: Before the Storm, you've come to know the world of Arcadia Bay and its heroines, Max and Chloe. While Life is Strange 2 focuses on a new set of characters in a new setting, it’s unmistakably cut from the same cloth – from the great soundtrack and consequence-heavy decisions to be made, to the slow revelation that there’s more to their world than what lies on the surface.

Like its predecessors, Life is Strange 2 is spread out across multiple chapters in an episodic release format. (A season pass purchase will be your best value, and will net you each new chapter as it’s released.) The story follows 17-year-old Sean Diaz and his little brother, Daniel, as they’re forced to run away from their home and take to the road. Most interesting is this game’s focus on their sibling relationship. As Sean, your every action sets an example for young Daniel – we’ll be eager to see how the repercussions of the decisions we make play out across future installments. (Available for XB1, PS4 & Steam: Buy it here.)

The Missing: J.J. Macfield and the Island of Memories (Arc System Works)

SRP: $29.99

Out on a camping trip with her closest companion, Emily, college student J.J. Macfield wakes up to find her friend missing. She embarks on a search for Emily as her world quickly turns upside down, finding her surroundings inhabited by strange, dark beings and herself suddenly (mostly) immortal. As she traverses the increasingly disturbing terrain, J.J. will have to solve puzzles by intentionally dismembering herself. Need to knock down a crate? Toss a severed hand at it. Need to weight down a plank? The best way to do that would be with your newly-hacked off legs.

The Missing is the newest game from designer SWERY, who brought us the insane, Twin Peaks-inspired cult game Deadly Premonition. Strange, unsettling, and yet emotionally resonant, The Missing combines a compelling story with some of the most outside-the-box puzzle-solving you’ll find in a game. While not for the weak-stomached, The Missing is a unique experience not to be missed. (Available for XB1, PS4, NS, & Steam: Buy it here.)

Board Games

8Bit Box (iello Games)

SRP: $44.99

We’re switching things up and going full analog for our final entry in this year’s video game gift guide. This boxed set of tabletop board games takes its inspiration from the world of gaming consoles by including an assortment of shared components that can be used to set up the three different games (or “cartridges”) included in the box. The games themselves have some obvious parallels to famous video games, from the Pac-Man-inspired Pixoid (in which one player is chased through a maze by three ghost players), the F-Zero­­-like racer Outspeed, and the Track & Field-esque Stadium; each is played primarily using a trio of dials laid out to look like a video game controller. It’s a neat idea – three games essentially for the price of one – made even cooler by the many small touches that help convey the video game theming, such as a box housing the shared components which looks almost like a Wii unit, and how each game is housed in its own box made to resemble the ones you’d find SNES games inside. Thanks to its design, it’s likely we’ll see more games released for the 8Bit Box down the road. (Buy it here.) 



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