Jun 04, 2009 Music Web Exclusive

Sleepwalking Through The Mekong documents Dengue Fever's performance in Cambodia—marking the first performance of Cambodian music by a Western group since the fall of the Khmer Rouge. Though Dengue Fever formed in the States, founding brothers Ethan and Zac Holtzman sought out a Cambodian singer in order to better capture the nuance of Cambodian rock n' roll from the 1960s and ’70s. More

Meanderthals

Desire Lines

Smalltown Supersound

Jun 04, 2009 Music Web Exclusive

Idjut Boys and Rune Lindbaek joined forces as Meanderthals to produce an album that pulses its way through prog, disco, ethereal, folk, and more. More

Jun 03, 2009 Music Web Exclusive

Known to casual indie-rock fans as, “That guy from The Postal Service who isn’t Ben Gibbard,” Jimmy Tamborello (a.k.a. Dntel) has been a fixture on the electronica scene for nearly a decade and a half. In 1994, inspired by Aphex Twin, µ-ziq, and Warp Records, Tamborello compiled his first collection of songs onto a cassette that would go on to become Something Always Goes Wrong. More

Bricolage

Bricolage

Slumberland

Jun 02, 2009 Music Web Exclusive

In the early 1980s, the hallowed Glasgow School introduced a cadre of smart pop bands to the world, Orange Juice being its top scholar. The Glaswegian quartet Bricolage is the latest addition to that storied tradition. The band may have very little to do with the musical term of the same name but they do try so very hard to approximate its adventurous ethos. More

Jun 02, 2009 Music Web Exclusive

Whilst fellow purveyors of brittle and bruised Americana Bonnie 'Prince' Billy and Damien Jurado have begun to embrace a fuller sonic palette of late, the music of Joshua Tillman maintains a stripped-down, world-weary restraint. Tillman's solo output—which stretches back to 2004—also differs considerably from the soaring chamber pop of the all-conquering Fleet Foxes whom he joined as a drummer in early 2008. More

May 29, 2009 Music Web Exclusive

Of all the works released that strange, mystical year of 1959, none came close to the cultural saturation or financial bonanza of Time Out, by The Dave Brubeck Quartet. Its million-selling "Take Five" single assured the full platter prominence in any personal stash, which is funny in retrospect, considering Columbia's initial reservations about its potential. Too weird, they said. More

May 29, 2009 Music Web Exclusive

Charles Mingus was one prolific motherfucker in jazz's greatest year. That February he was bunkered in New York's Atlantic Studios whipping up Blues & Roots for the Ertegun brothers. Three months later he tromped off to 30th Street to drop Mingus Ah Um in time to be lugged by college swellheads to off-campus soirees. That November he was back in the studio yet again, prepping Mingus Dynasty for the new decade. More

May 29, 2009 Music Web Exclusive

Released in 1960, Sketches of Spain marked Miles Davis' third collaboration with arranger Gil Evans. Their musical relationship was a mutually advantageous one: Davis got to explore different, even classical textures, and Evans got to hang with Davis, whose participation assured an audience for what might have otherwise been a painfully square adventure. Davis had cooked in Spanish before, most recently on Blue's "Flamenco Sketches," so this wasn't an impulsive veer for the sake of contrarianism. More

May 29, 2009 Music Web Exclusive

Musicians don't like to be cataloged like insects, yet they end up filling in for the critic in the most humorous ways. Case in point:  Sean Rawls, the leader of the 15-strong San Francisco collective Still Flyin' likes to call his band's party-ready tunes, "HAMMJAMM" music. His words, not mine. It's the sort of sugarcoated-cum-caffeinated made-up genre that can soundtrack your beer pong sesh or pizza pig-out. You know what I'm talking about dude? More