Delirium’s Party: A Little Endless Storybook (Vertigo) | Under The Radar Magazine Under the Radar | Music Blog for the Indie Music Magazine
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Delirium’s Party: A Little Endless Storybook

Vertigo

By Jill Thompson

Jul 19, 2011 DC Comics Bookmark and Share


What if you threw a soiree for some of life’s most epic personifications? Thus is the premise behind Delirium’s Party. Featuring diminutive characters based on Neil Gaiman’s Sandman series, Delirium’s Party is as whimsical as the name implies—a child-like tale for all ages. Written and inked by Jill Thompson (who also had a hand in the significantly less kid-friendly series, Finals), the story is as simple as the beautiful watercolor art is vivid. Forgoing traditional comic panels or thought bubbles, Delirium’s Party reads not unlike a child’s fairytaie—which in a way it is.

A bundle of unfocused energy, Delirium (resplendent in her ever changing hair color) decides to make her sister Despair smile by throwing a party. She invites along siblings: Death, Destiny, Dream, Destruction, and Desire, and—aided by her faithful dog Barnabas—sets out to create a memorable afternoon tea. The results of her efforts—and the clever wordplay along the way—are best left unspoiled, except to say that sometimes joy comes the most unexpected of places.

A feast for the eyes, and an all-around charming read for children and adults alike. (www.vertigo.blog.dccomics.com)

Author rating: 8/10

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Average reader rating: 3/10



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Paiva
June 12th 2012
3:52am

Careful or the interwebs will dveleop a crush on you for this.I think what I loved about the movie is that it sat with me for a few days after I saw it- I spent time thinking how I would have done things differently (or maybe not) if it had been my own life. I spent a huge amount of time dissecting the last 10 seconds of the film.. the glance out the window and the glance back inside. Anything that causes me to dwell for that length of time, and get worked up about   is good in my books.