Gesaffelstein: Hyperion (Columbia) Review | Under the Radar Magazine Under the Radar | Music Blog for the Indie Music Magazine
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Gesaffelstein

Hyperion

Columbia

Apr 08, 2019 Web Exclusive Bookmark and Share


French producer Gesaffelstein (aka Mike Lévy), let too much time go by between album projects. Releasing debut Aleph in October 2013, Gesaffelsteinthe title is a word-blend of Gesamtkunstwerk, a work of art that makes use of many forms, and Albert Einsteinburst onto the dance music scene with a head-trip banger. Five years and five months later, Gesaffelstein is on the commercial Columbia roster for Hyperion, a lopsided sophomore album that lacks feeling.

No doubt, Aleph got Gesaffelstein attention: he DJ’ed all over the world, did a batch of remixes (Moby, Lana Del Rey, and Phoenix included), and scored the soundtrack for a 2015 film, Disorder. However, instead of riding the wave of Alephthe creation of “Hellifornia,” “Piece of Future,” and “Hate or Glory,” which makes me want to lift 12 bricks and go sprintingLévy let his artistic voice simmer. Years passed, a major-label contract was signed, and Aleph was buried in the depths of the iPod. Along came 2019 and Hyperion, a jet black album cover and no real press release. Gesaffelstein’s home page has nothing but two new videos, side by side, drenched in black.

Hyperion is not much more than an irregular platform for today’s top singers alongside synthesizer play that does not strive for heights. The Weeknd is the very first singer to put lyrics to a Gesaffelstein trackAleph was all instrumentaland his “I wanna fuck you slow with the lights on” line (“Lost in the Fire”) is a disappointment. Apparently, The Weeknd wants to have a baby, but also says “bring a friend, I will fuck you straight.” “Blast Off,” featuring Pharrell Williams, is more confusing than moving, and “So Bad,” featuring HAIM, is an average exercise. Electric Youth and Gesaffelstein create an Italians Do It Better vibe with “Forever,” almost saving it with a mathematical outro. “Humanity Gone” is a 10-plus-minute, church organ and saxophone suite that is a random ending for an album full of tracks between three and four minutes long.

Advice for Gesaffelstein: ditch the singing guests, and experiment more with the danceable dimness. (www.gesaffelstein.com)

Author rating: 4.5/10

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Average reader rating: 3/10



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HappyBirthday
April 9th 2019
1:27pm

Humanity Gone” is a 10-plus-minute, church organ and saxophone suite

Harold
June 19th 2021
7:01am

the title is a word-blend of Gesamtkunstwerk, a work of art that makes use of many forms, and Albert Einstein—burst onto the dance music scene with a head-trip banger.

- Brentwood Pro Concrete Co.